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In the state of California, Lemon Law protects consumers from continuing to experience the huge hassle of spending days trying to fix issues in cars time and time again. We’re here to help you figure out if your car is considered a lemon and how we can help you.

California Lemon Law:

In the state of California, Lemon Law applies to new or used vehicles either purchased or leased where the buyer repeatedly goes to the dealer for the same issue. If a manufacturer cannot repair a consumer good after a reasonable number of repair attempts, then it must either replace or refund the consumer’s money for the defective product. The California Lemon Law also can be applied to other consumer products such as boats or motorcycles.

Key Parts of California Lemon Law:

  • Manufacturer has to repair the vehicle within a fair & reasonable number of repair tests. Reasonable is determined on a case-by-case basis
  • Manufacturer must pay for the consumer’s reasonable attorney costs
  • Manufacturers must provide enough access to repair facilities for consumers If vehicle has been in repairs for at least 30 days (can be collective), it may automatically qualify as a lemon.

Limited number of how many repair attempts there can be to fix the defective product

Offer the consumer a replacement the vehicle with a comparable model or give the buyer their money back and pay off the outstanding loan balance

Qualifications to be Considered a Lemon:

A vehicle is considered a lemon when the dealership has been given numerous opportunities to repair the problem within the warranty period all of which are unsuccessful. There is no exact requirement for how many visits.

Lemon Law Remedies

Does the Lemon Law apply to used vehicles?

Yes. California’s Lemon Law applies to new and used vehicles so long as you had attempted repairs under the factory warranty.

What if my car is a lease?

California’s Lemon Law applies to both cars that are purchased or leased in California. A vehicle does not qualify for repurchase if it purchased through a private party.

Are There Arbitration Requirements?

No. California consumers are not required to arbitrate their Lemon Law claims against an automaker. You may immediately pursue your rights in state court with a jury.

Does the Lemon Law apply to vehicles used in business?

Yes. Provided the business registers no more than 5 vehicles and the vehicle’s gross weight is less than 10,000 pounds, vehicles primarily used for business are covered by California’s Lemon Law

  • Monthly payments and down payment;
  • Collateral charges, which include sales tax, finance charges, and prorated registration and service contracts;
  • Incidental and consequential expenses that are related to the lemon, which include rental car or tow expenses; and
  • Payment of your loan balance.

If you leased your vehicle and it is a “lemon,” your refund will consist of the following:

  • Lease payments and down payment;
  • Collateral charges, which include sales tax, finance charges, and prorated registration and service contracts;
  • Incidental and consequential expenses that are related to the lemon, which include rental car or tow expenses; and
  • Payment of any remaining lease obligations.

If vehicle does not reach qualifications of a ‘lemon’

Cash Compensation

If your vehicle is a “lemon” and you get a replacement vehicle, whether it was purchased or leased, the replacement vehicle must:

If the problems with your vehicle do not rise to the level of it being considered a “lemon,” you may be entitled to receive cash compensation for its diminished value as a result of its problems. Many times the problems with a vehicle may not rise to the level of a “substantial impairment.” In these situations, the manufacturer will often pay the consumer a “cash and keep” settlement. This is where you will keep your vehicle and receive a sum of money for the problems you experienced with it. Also, the remaining portion of the warranty will remain in effect.